New Issue of SBET

Hey everyone, the new issue of SBET is fresh off the presses. This issue has a particular focus on Bavinck, as you can see from the table of contents:

Guest Editorial
JAMES EGLINTON
1-3

Bavinck’s Use of Wisdom Literature in Systematic Theology
JOHN BOLT
4-23

Bavinck’s Use of Augustine as an Antidote to Ritschl
MARK W. ELLIOTT
24-40

Herman Bavinck and His Reformed Sources on the Call to Grace: A Shift in Emphasis towards the Internal Work of the Spirit
HENK VAN DEN BELT
41-59

The Religious Character of Modernism and the Modern Character of Religion: A Case Study of Herman Bavinck’s Engagement with Modern Culture
GEORGE HARINCK
60-77

Herman Bavinck on the Imitation of Christ
DIRK VAN KEULEN
78-91

Herman Bavinck and the Basis of Christian Certainty
DONALD MACLEOD
92-107

Bavinck, Barth, and the Uniqueness of the Eucharist
PAUL T. NIMMO
108-126

As always, SBET has an incredible line-up of book reviews as well. In this issue, to highlight just one, Luke Bretherton reviews Graham Ward’s Politics of Discipleship. Here is a teaser for those interested:

But if, as Ward contends, ‘to act is fun- damental to being political’ (p. 261) what constitutes constructive forms of Christian political action and how might we account for them? Ward is too nervous about action, too polite perhaps, to suggest what should be done. I detect the disabling stasis in an over-emphasis on the apocalyptic in Scripture combined with a heavy investment with post-modern tools of criticism. As a way of unveiling ‘what is the case’ or ‘what is really going on’ under the shimmering surfaces of the post-modern city and beyond the all-enveloping clamour of the entertainment industry such a combination is a powerful and prophetic mode of description. Yet, while this combination of the apocalyptic and the post-modern might be very revealing, it leaves us with little scope for concrete public action and long- term, mutually responsible forms of association (and the building of the kinds of institutions that can sustain them) that are central for any real Christian politics. Moreover, the apocalyptic is not the only genre in the Bible. Indeed, it is used rather sparingly in Scripture. To emphasize the Bible’s apocalyptic voice as against its other modes of address is to do a disservice to the Canon. (p. 143)

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