When your friends write books

In the last month three friends have given me a copy of their most recently written book. Just moments ago, my friend and colleague Tom Bergler handed me his book, From Here to Maturity: Overcoming the Juvenilization of American Christianity. My response matched the one I had with my other two friends: “Wow, thank you so much; I can’t wait to read it!” But alas, I am deep in the weeds of my semester and probably won’t be able to touch any of these great books until Christmas recess. Still, I thought it would be fun to highlight them here, and after the New Year I hope to blog about each.

Following on the heals of his acclaimed The Juvenilization of From here to MaturityAmerican Christianity, Tom’s new book is a hands on guide for helping individuals and faith communities to grow in Christian maturity. Tom suggests that spiritual maturity, what he calls “basic competence in the Christian life”, is not only desirable but attainable, and throughout the book he offers a wealth of practical, research-based guidance for effectively fostering spiritual maturity in Christian believers and congregations. The problem with much North American Christianity, which he so carefully and effectively outlined in his previous book as “juvenilization”, is here addressed and accompanied with steps toward maturity.

Matt Heard is a long-time friend (way, way back), and his new book, Life with a Capital L: Life with a Capital LEmbracing your God-given Humanity, is a fantastically accessible and robust portrayal of life with Christ as redeemed humanity – full, true, authentic humanity in all its messy and beautiful physicalness. Talk of “spirituality”, the buzz word of contemporary religion, often has the effect of downplaying God’s commitment to physical reality, thus Matt writes, “When God brings me to life by his Spirit, the purpose is to enable me to be reborn into a new way of being human – a return to my original purpose of appreciating and living out the privilege and responsibility of being part of the Creator’s creation. My spirituality isn’t something to be developed in a vacuum; its not an isolated compartment of my life but a central part of being human. An engaged and healthy spirituality should breed an engaged and healthy humanity.”

Beloved DustKyle Strobel, my coeditor on Sanctified by Grace, just sent me his book, Beloved Dust: Drawing Close to God by Discovering the Truth About Yourself. It is a beautifully written book, and timely. Not unlike the beginning of Calvin’s Institutes, Kyle and his coauthor Jamin Goggin show the basic importance of grounding self-understanding in God’s understanding of us: “We live on borrowed breath. We are alive in the most profound sense of the word – filled with the very breath that spoke creation in being. Within this tension is a status that is regal but lowly, significant but insignificant, unique but ordinary. God looks upon humanity’s frame of dust and says, “I formed you, I love you, and I delight in you.” You are beloved dust.” “This vulnerable position,” they continue, “is, paradoxically, where life is found. Life is not found in hiding from God, in showing God that you are good or convincing him or others that you are valuable. Life is found in real, honest, and vulnerable relationship with the God who calls you his beloved.”

Advertisements

One thought on “When your friends write books

  1. Good stuff, Kent. Now, if I could get my two friends who edited Sanctified by Grace to send me a copy, I’d be a happy guy indeed :)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s