The “Untheological” Preacher

screen-shot-2018-02-26-at-12-18-23-pmIt’s not uncommon to hear preachers of a certain theological stripe say from the pulpit something like, “What I’m saying isn’t theological, it’s just biblical.” The sentiment is understandable even if the statement isn’t tenable. In many folks’ minds—both clergy and lay people—theology is a distraction from the real content of the Bible, from the real purpose of worship, or from the real goal of discipleship. 

Some of this sentiment can be chalked up to bad theology, written densely and in specialist language to no clear end. We might also wonder how the movement of theologians from the church to the offices of universities may have precipitated a sense of distance between theology and the church. Further still, theological debates often require an acceptance of nuance that is less than preferable when dealing with matters of salvation—in other words, people might chafe at theology because they feel it leads them to wonder if they can know anything for sure about God, life, or eternity. 

While I can charitably acknowledge these criticisms and concerns about theology, I think they reveal a narrow assumption about how theology works within the church. It seems that most people who think theology is more harmful than helpful assume theology works mostly to clarify (or confuse) matters of Christian belief that have little bearing on Christian life. If this assessment is on point, then it would take a substantial effort to redeem theology in the hearts and minds of everyday church folk, let alone the clergy who have taught them to think this way about theology. If that’s all it is, why do we need it at all? Continue reading

Weekender: May 20, 2017

Weekender: 05/20/2017

Welcome to the weekend! Each week, we like to offer a few quick highlights from our week that we think will give you something worthwhile to think about over the weekend. Enjoy this week’s Weekender and add to it in the comments below!

Quote Worth Repeating: “Frequently biblical scholars will claim a doctrine has no scriptural basis because they do not understand what is truly at stake in the doctrine itself.” From Christian Doctrine and the Old Testament by Gary Anderson.

Blog Post to Read: “Be Not Afraid” by Amy Laura Hall is an essay about fear and hope — among other things.

Old School Trending: One specific topic is garnering fresh attention from some renowned theologians. Fleming Rutledge, N. T. Wright, and Greg Boyd have all published books in the past couple of years about the crucifixion. Here is a collection of resources related to these publications:

  1. Fleming Rutledge’s The Crucifixion was published (November 2015) by Eerdmans. Here is an interview with her regarding the book. You might also enjoy listening to her discuss preaching Christ crucified today.
  2. The Day the Revolution Began (Harper Collins) is N. T. Wright’s effort to “challenge commonly held beliefs” about Christ’s crucifixion. Here is an interview with Wright about his book.
  3. Fortress Press published Greg Boyd’s Crucifixion of the Warrior God (two volumes) in April 2017. Boyd is responding to reviews of his book over on his blog ReKnew.

Wright and Boyd joined Dennis Edwards in a MissioAlliance webinar to discuss the crucifixion (it costs $3 to download the video). Perhaps we will be fortunate enough to see all three of these faithful theologians together for a discussion in the future.

Questions to Ponder: After preaching last week, I have continued to consider ways to introduce the movements of the liturgy into non-liturgical worshipping communities. I have some ideas, but I would be interested to hear some of your thoughts:

  • How have you creatively maintained liturgical movements in a church whose worship is more (for lack of a better term) contemporary?
  • How have you educated congregants about the liturgy so that they know what it is they’re doing?

Ascension Thursday: Salvador Dali and Karl Barth

As an intern at Anchor Community Church (United Brethren), I have the opportunity to plan an Ascension Thursday service. This is something new for this community and, quite honestly, for me. Several things make this a tricky service to plan. Some of them are practical: the church never gathers on Thursday evenings. Others are theological: many of the congregants aren’t sure why the ascension matters. I have a few ideas to draw folks to the service and a few others to help them leave praising God for presiding as the Church’s heavenly priest.

One way that I hope to do this is to encourage the church to see the bizarreness of the ascension. This, I hope, will not leave them confused, but help them to experience the wild reality that Christ’s ascension, similar to the incarnation, unites creatureliness within the divine mystery. To do this, we will reflect together on Salvador Dali’s The Ascension of Christ (see below).

dali_1_3 Continue reading