Living Room Liturgy: Celebrating God with All Creation

Living Room Liturgy: Celebrating God with All Creation

For those of us in the midwest, one of the greatest gifts we’ve received during the quarantine are sunny and at-least-it’s-not-freezing days. We may not gather with loved ones but we can enjoy the sunshine, the blooming tulips and daffodils, and that comforting aroma that comes after the spring rain. 

Braver souls than me, however, tell me there is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing. One dear friend is trying to spend several hours outside every day this year. (She started in JANUARY.) Regardless, whether you’re a fair-weather outdoors person or an every-day-outside person, this liturgy is for you.

Gather the few things you’ll need and find a place to pray and celebrate. Your backyard is great. A park is perfect. Deep in the woods or on a suspension bridge over a river would be  just right. Get outside, somewhere with birds singing praise and the trees clapping their branches. Make the outdoors your living room for this time of prayer. After all, a garden was our original living room, wasn’t it?

May the Lord bless you as you pray!

(Click here for a downloadable, printable PDF of the liturgy.)

Continue reading

Living Room Liturgy: A Liturgy of Silence

Megan Condry, youth and children’s director at St. Peter’s First Community Church, offers us another living room liturgy. This one is especially helpful for Holy Saturday, in the silence of waiting for Christ’s resurrection. It is, however, also a beautiful liturgy for use regularly throughout the year.

Silence.  Quiet.  Rest.  These are not words we are familiar with in our fast-paced, frenzied, and busy world.  Faster, louder, more seem to be the resounding phrases around us rather than quietness, rest, and solitude.  The challenge of silence is not a new one for us and yet God makes it clear throughout His Word that it is through rest that we find our strength in Him alone.  “For thus said the Lord God, the Holy One of Israel, ‘In returning and rest you shall be saved; in quietness and in trust shall be your strength.’ But you were unwilling,” (Isaiah 30:15).  The way is simple and the instructions clear, but are we too unwilling?  Does the fear of silence keep us at bay?  Do we wonder if we can afford to take time to rest in God with all the other demands of our time?  Are we unsure about what to do when trying to spend time in quiet with God?  Do we worry about the things God might want to share with us so it is easier to just keep moving along?  All those thoughts can keep us from God but we know through the Bible, through the experience of believers throughout time, and through our own quiet moments, that it is in our moments connecting with God that we find peace, hope, direction, and real rest.  “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest” (Matthew 11:28).  

Continue reading
Living Room Liturgy: Maundy Thursday

Living Room Liturgy: Maundy Thursday

A Liturgy of Preparing, Eating, and Serving for Maundy Thursday At Home

On Maundy Thursday, we remember the night before Christ’s betrayal, when he joined his disciples for a meal (which would become The Lord’s Supper). John tells us he then washed the disciples’ feet as a sign of how he came to serve, and how we are to serve others. This liturgy is based on that story and invites participants to prepare and eat a meal together and to serve others in various ways. It can be done individually or with a small group.

Continue reading
Living Room Liturgy: A Liturgy of Laughter

Living Room Liturgy: A Liturgy of Laughter

I wrote a couple weeks ago about how social distancing may create an opportunity to practice solitude. What I’ve since realized is that for many of us it is not necessarily clear how to make the most of our solitude. Prayer is hard on your own. Without the weekly encouragement and example of praying together in communal worship, our own individual prayer lives can feel dull or diminished. So, I thought I’d try to offer some “Living Room Liturgies” that you, your family, or you with some folks on a Zoom call can use to give prayer a bit of structure. I hope you’ll share them if you find them useful! (Download the PDF here for a printer-friendly copy.)

Continue reading