GIVEAWAY: Nearly Every N. T. Wright Book

I’m not sure how else to put this. YOU NEED TO ENTER THIS GIVEAWAY. Kurt Willems, the self-proclaimed “theology curator,” is outdoing himself with this one. Click here to sign up.

If you’re still reading, I’ve obviously not convinced you. Here’s the list of the more than 50 books included in the giveaway (valued at nearly $1,100):

  • New Testament for Everyone (entire 18 vol. devotional-commentary set!)
  • The Day Revolution Began
  • Simply Jesus
  • After You Believe
  • Surprised by Hope
  • Scripture and the Authority of God
  • How God Became King
  • The Case for the Psalms
  • Surprised by Scripture
  • Simply Good News
  • Paul: A Biography
  • The Kingdom New Testament
  • Simply Christian
  • Climax of the Covenant
  • The New Test and People of God
  • Jesus and the Victory of God
  • The Resurrection of the Son of God
  • Paul and the Faithfulness of God
  • Following Jesus: Biblical Reflections
  • The Lord and his Prayer
  • What Saint Paul Really Said
  • For All God’s Worth
  • The Meaning of Jesus
  • The Challenge of Jesus
  • The Resurrection of Jesus
  • Paul in Fresh Perspective
  • The Meal Jesus Gave Us
  • For All the Saints?
  • Judas and the Gospel of Jesus
  • The Scriptures, the Cross, and the Power of God
  • Evil & Justice of God
  • Justification: God’s Plan and Paul’s Vision
  • Small Faith, Great God
  • Pauline Perspectives: Collected Essays
  • Paul and his Recent Interpreters
  • The Paul Debate

Seriously? You’re still reading? Enter the giveaway now!

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Another Giveaway: Over 30 Books by NT Wright and Greg Boyd

Howdy fellow theologians,

I just got back from a late afternoon run in the summer heat and was happily surprised to find a link to another giveaway. (If you missed the last one, there is still time to enter the Homebrewed Christianity giveaway!)

This time around, it’s Theology Curator who is offering quite the lot. They are giving away over 30 books (worth $550) written by N.T. Wright and Greg Boyd. You can sign up for the giveaway by clicking here.

N.T. Wright (left) and Greg Boyd (right) are two of today’s most influential theologians.

While you’re at it, give some of Theology Curator’s podcasts a listen and follow them if you like it!

Until next time,
Zen

Weekender: May 20, 2017

Weekender: 05/20/2017

Welcome to the weekend! Each week, we like to offer a few quick highlights from our week that we think will give you something worthwhile to think about over the weekend. Enjoy this week’s Weekender and add to it in the comments below!

Quote Worth Repeating: “Frequently biblical scholars will claim a doctrine has no scriptural basis because they do not understand what is truly at stake in the doctrine itself.” From Christian Doctrine and the Old Testament by Gary Anderson.

Blog Post to Read: “Be Not Afraid” by Amy Laura Hall is an essay about fear and hope — among other things.

Old School Trending: One specific topic is garnering fresh attention from some renowned theologians. Fleming Rutledge, N. T. Wright, and Greg Boyd have all published books in the past couple of years about the crucifixion. Here is a collection of resources related to these publications:

  1. Fleming Rutledge’s The Crucifixion was published (November 2015) by Eerdmans. Here is an interview with her regarding the book. You might also enjoy listening to her discuss preaching Christ crucified today.
  2. The Day the Revolution Began (Harper Collins) is N. T. Wright’s effort to “challenge commonly held beliefs” about Christ’s crucifixion. Here is an interview with Wright about his book.
  3. Fortress Press published Greg Boyd’s Crucifixion of the Warrior God (two volumes) in April 2017. Boyd is responding to reviews of his book over on his blog ReKnew.

Wright and Boyd joined Dennis Edwards in a MissioAlliance webinar to discuss the crucifixion (it costs $3 to download the video). Perhaps we will be fortunate enough to see all three of these faithful theologians together for a discussion in the future.

Questions to Ponder: After preaching last week, I have continued to consider ways to introduce the movements of the liturgy into non-liturgical worshipping communities. I have some ideas, but I would be interested to hear some of your thoughts:

  • How have you creatively maintained liturgical movements in a church whose worship is more (for lack of a better term) contemporary?
  • How have you educated congregants about the liturgy so that they know what it is they’re doing?